Category: Culture

Post Surgical Post

Post Surgical Post: To suffer or not to suffer; there is no question So, here I am, your Landscapes for Learning hostess with the mostess, recovering from surgery and pondering the meaning of life, or um…rather…philosophizing about suffering…again. (That’s supposed to be a funny reference to my previous post.)  As I sit here coexisting rather unpleasantly with my

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Dear Dr. Jordan B. Peterson

Dear Dr. Jordan B. Peterson, Thank you for being: Courageous, Informed, Logical, Intense, Persistent, and Passionate. I suppose you could say I have deeply immersed myself in a self-made course called, ‘The life and times of Dr. Jordan B.Peterson.’ I have been reading your book, Maps of Meaning (Routledge, 1999), reading about you online, watching

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Learning to Unlearn

It was in the hot room at a Bikram yoga studio, standing directly under the bright lights, in front of the mirrors, trying to balance, in silence, everyday, for 90 minutes, where I learned the art of unlearning. I learned to let go. A vital aspect of learning is unlearning. Unlearning is intending to let

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Dear Mr. & Mrs. Know-it-all

Dear Mr. & Mrs. Know-it-all, In The American Scholar, his speech to Harvard graduates, Ralph Waldo Emerson proclaimed, “Life is a dictionary!” encouraging Americans, especially the young scholars in front of him, to trust their own experiences: direct, sensory experience in nature, if they truly wanted to live a life of learning. You can read

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Dear Efficient Utilitarian Student,

Dear Efficient Utilitarian Student, It’s not your fault that you were raised with the great American values of utility and efficiency. These values are enacted and followed by virtually everyone around you– your parents, your school, your government; they’ve been enacted throughout most of American history, especially in the Industrial Revolution, in the world of

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Just a thought…How Higher Ed. Can Help the Natural Landscape

After reading “Ending Extracurricular Privilege” by Olga Kahzan in December 21st issue of The Atlantic Monthly, I realize just how much influence higher education has on the values, beliefs, behaviors, habits, and choices of their incoming students as well as their parents and their high schools. (I mean, I know the competition among students over

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